Blinded by emotion: How emotion shapes what we see

Visual cognition and clinical science have much to say to each other, often offering mutually informative views of a given topic

schedule Date & time
Date/time
21 Aug 2018 5:00pm - 21 Aug 2018 6:00pm
person Speaker

Speakers

Steven B Most, UNSW Sydney

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Description

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Visual cognition and clinical science have much to say to each other, often offering mutually informative views of a given topic. A prime example of this is the literature on emotion-driven attentional biases. Whereas the clinical literature has linked emotional dysfunctions to attentional biases broadly defined, visual cognition has drawn distinctions between isolatable attention mechanisms. Synthesizing these approaches yields a powerful approach to sharpening our understanding of the relationships between attention, emotion, and individual differences. Here, I focus on a phenomenon known as emotion-induced blindness and discuss evidence that different measures of attentional bias tap into different underlying mechanisms. Such findings underscore the importance of distinguishing between attention mechanisms when constructing theoretical models of, and interventions that target, particular emotional disorders. 

lab website: https://motivatedattentionlab.wordpress.com/

Bio: Steve is Senior Lecturer in Psychology at UNSW Sydney, where he heads the Motivated Attention and Perception Lab. Prior to moving to Australia, he was Associate Professor of Psychology at the University of Delaware in the USA. He earned his PhD at Harvard University and received further post-doctoral training at Vanderbilt and Yale universities. Grounded in visual cognition, Steve’s research examines how motivation and emotion shape what we see and remember, as well as the consequences of such interactions for mental and physical health.

Location

Peter Baume Building 42A Room 2.01